USF Garden Project


REMINDER: EVENTS TO ADD TO YOUR CALENDAR
October 31, 2008, 6:02 am
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Hey Farmers,

Here’s a reminder of the events we have going on in November:

1. Community Garden Workday

In the USF Community Garden

Saturday, November 8th 10 AM-2 PM

Come join us for our second community garden workday!  There will be food, fun, and of course, vegetables!

2. Community Garden Meeting

In the USF Community Garden

Tuesday, November 25th 12:30 PM

Come and join us for our second community garden meeting of the year.  We’ll be further discussing where the harvest will go.  E-mail enbairstow@dons.usfca.edu if you have any issues you want to discuss.

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Field Trip: Alemany Farm
October 24, 2008, 8:29 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

“The trip to Alemany Farm (as well as the adventurous excursion getting there), was very exciting.  One of the most striking aspects, again, was the richness of the soil, despite being located in the middle of the city, on the edge of the highway.  One would think the pollution would adversely affect the beds, but as our guide shared with us, this is not the case, as the soil has been adequately cared for.  The variety of the crops was inspiring, knowing that in our own garden we will not be limited, either, and the small creek nearby was a soothing touch in the garden.  The formation of the acre(s) themselves, on the slight hill and behind housing, was an interesting configuration, and was what I felt to be a very informative look at society, and how easily gardens can be integrated into them.

      The work we did was fun, as well: for my part, I worked at pulling up pumpkin vines and hula-hoing the soil.  I am still working out my fear of spiders and other soil dwellers, and I feel (and hope) that the more we work with rich soil ourselves, the more tolerant I will become of these beneficial creatures.  I still have an idyllic vision of myself working on a farm and living off the land one day, so I know I will need to embrace the insects that live in the soil.  I hope that we can have them in our garden here at school one day, too, as they seem to be a sign of healthy earth.

      Learning to clean the tools may be as crucial for caring for the plants, and it is reassuring that we are taught those skills, too, and not just introduced to tending the plants and vegetables in the garden.  I felt that this fieldtrip (and the pie that followed) was an insightful look at how gardens can be successfully grown in the middle of the city, and that no matter how limiting our factors may seem (climate, location, slope, time, etc.), we are not at a dead end.  There is much we can do still, and the passion I see in the people we visit, as well as the passion invested in their land and the fruits of their labor, is very inspiring.  The work may be taxing, but everywhere we go and everyone we see proves to me again and again that it is worth it, and that the world needs it.”

-Jessica Cordova

 

For more information on Alemany Farm, please visit the website at http://www.alemanyfarm.org/.  



Event Announcements
October 24, 2008, 8:17 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Even though school has been in session for less than two months, the group has already accomplished so much.  Check out our next few upcoming posts for information regarding the group’s field trips, accomplishments in and out of the garden, and online resources collected thus far.  Also, don’t forget we hold USF COMMUNITY GARDEN MEETINGS ON THE LAST TUESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT 12:30 PM (NEXT ON 10/28) LOCATED IN THE USF COMMUNITY GARDEN ACROSS THE PARKING LOT FROM THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ON TURK STREET AND A COMMUNITY GARDEN WORK PARTY ON NOVEMBER 8TH FROM 10 AM-2 PM.  

For any further questions or information, please don’t hesitate to contact Elyssa Bairstow (enbairstow@dons.usfca.edu) or Susanne Umbenhower (seumbenhower@dons.usfca.edu).



Field Trip: Garden for the Environment
October 14, 2008, 5:42 pm
Filed under: trips

In the center of this bustling city of San Francisco lies a small organic garden that manages to survive, despite the city’s difficult climate and soil.  I felt that this excursion was very informative, not only about the history of the garden itself, but it also showed me ways that we could improve our garden since they are geographically close (and therefore an easier reference for microclimates, soil and rainfall than just our textbook).

I felt really inspired by the cob oven and I’d like to see that reproduced in our outdoor kitchen.  Plus the use of raised beds over plants seems like an efficient use of our limited space.

This trip really ties into our garden and by learning how they deal with local situations we can use their experiences (good and bad) to help the USF Garden.  I felt very informed concerning the soil: how to reduce pollution with raised beds, how local sandy soil doesn’t hold water or nutrients well and finally about composting using hot boxing or red wiggler worms.

Overall I enjoyed this excursion because it taught me to really observe the garden, as well as giving me a chance to assist the organization by weeding.  For more information check out their website at http://www.gardenfortheenvironment.org/.  

 

-Susanne Umbenhower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Field Trip: Farmer’s Market
October 13, 2008, 9:32 pm
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For this blog, we have decided to post one of the group member’s written field trip reports for each field trip taken.  Our first field trip/field trip report assignment was to go to a farmer’s market in San Francisco….

Field Trip Report (Ferry Building Embarcadero Farmer’s Market):

 

    “Today (9/9) I went to the farmer’s market next the Ferry Building in San Francisco’s Embarcadero.  I arrived during the last hour of the market and came across Chue’s Farm Fresh Vegetables, a vegetable stand from Fresno, CA (just under 200 miles from San Francisco.  As the vegetable stands at this particular farmer’s market were scare, I decided to stop and talk to the farmer at Chue’s.   I learned which vegetables are meant to be grown in the fall and winter growing seasons in both San Francisco and Fresno.  I learned that eggplants are suitable to be planted in the fall and winter growing seasons in both parts of California; however, a particular species of eggplant (the Chinese eggplant) can only be planted in Fresno area.  I also learned that herbs such as mint are very suitable for the fall and winter growing seasons.

            In terms of criticisms, I was surprised to learn not only that many of the farmers with stands at the Embarcadero Farmer’s Market were from 200-plus miles away from San Francisco, but also that Chue’s Farm Fresh Vegetables in particular uses synthetic fertilizers (with “natural compounds”).  As much as I don’t have a specific knowledge of the effect of chemical fertilizers on plants and the environment, I know enough to know that these fertilizers affect the plant’s chemistry as well as the soil and ecology of surrounding areas.  I think these are interesting aspects of the Ferry Building Farmer’s Market because most people assume that all farmers’ market food is very localized and chemical-free.  Now I know to ask the farmer explicitly.  For my vegetable to be planted in our garden, I chose bok choy on the basis that it was not currently growing in the garden and the fact that the vegetable is highly suitable for the fall and winter growing season.  Also, it is a common staple is soups and stir fries-two of my favorite meals!”

-Elyssa Bairstow

For more information regarding farmer’s markets in the San Francisco Bay Area please go to http://www.sfgate.com/food/farmersmarkets/.  



And Now Introducing…The 2008-2009 Garden Project Blog!!
October 13, 2008, 9:14 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Hello All!  Welcome to the Garden Project Living-Learning Community and USF Community Garden Blog! With 20 male and female students from all over in the group, the Garden Project is a little different this year than last.  

Formally, the Garden Project is a community that “offers a rare opportunity for students to engage in community design and gardening through the active cultivation of the university’s 1⁄4 acre organic garden nestled in the heart of campus.  The Garden Project is an innovative living-learning community for first-year students of any major– no previous gardening experience necessary. Established in response to student interest in how to cope with rapidly changing and interconnected global conditions, the Garden Project creates an opportunity for students to form a tight-knit community to learn about climate change, water rights, food security, and social and economic justice as they relate to food production.The study of community supported agriculture, through historical research, analysis of organic garden strategies, hands on experiments, and field trips will assist students as they take the lead in the designing, cultivating, managing and harvesting USF’s community organic garden.”

Even though school has been in session for less than two months, the group has already accomplished so much.  Check out our next few upcoming posts for information regarding the group’s field trips, accomplishments in and out of the garden, and online resources collected thus far.  Also, don’t forget we hold USF COMMUNITY GARDEN MEETINGS ON THE LAST TUESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT 12:30 PM (NEXT ON 10/28) LOCATED IN THE USF COMMUNITY GARDEN ACROSS THE PARKING LOT FROM THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ON TURK STREET AND A COMMUNITY GARDEN WORK PARTY ON NOVEMBER 8TH FROM 10 AM-2 PM.  

For any further questions or information, please don’t hesitate to contact Elyssa Bairstow (enbairstow@dons.usfca.edu) or Susanne Umbenhower (seumbenhower@dons.usfca.edu).



Things done/Things to do
May 9, 2008, 6:56 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Check out our new Flickr Badge on the right. Blogroll coming soon 🙂